On the 25th November the Friends of Saddleworth Museum will provide supper at the Millgate Arts Centre from 5.30 pm prior to the curtain raising at 7.30 pm for the performance.

The Millgate Arts Centre (in association with the Saddleworth Players) invite local charities to raise funds for their organisation by selling tickets for a half or a full house at the Sunday evening performance of the Saddleworth Players productions. Many charities have benefited from this facility and may have boosted funds further by providing a supper for the audience. The Saddleworth Players give their performance free of charge, and the charity is asked to pay only the royalties fee.

In the 2018 the Saddleworth Players have already staged 4 such theatrical performances.

The next play, “The Pitmen Painters”, runs from 24th November to 1st December and the Saddleworth Museum and Gallery (registered charity no. 528225) , are honoured to accept the Saddleworth Players invitation for their charity performance on Sunday 25th November!

The Friends of Saddleworth Museum will provide supper at the Millgate Arts Centre from 5.30 pm prior to the curtain raising at 7.30 pm for the performance.

The cost is £12.50 per person and must be booked in advance. Tickets for this event are only available from the reception desk at the museum which is open between 1 and 4 pm daily. The telephone number at the museum is 01457 874093.

It is understood that the bar and dining area on the ground floor at the Millgate Arts Centre is hosting an exhibition by Diane Terry for duration of this play. The play itself is being sponsored the Tanner Business Centre.

The Pitman Painters is by Lee Hall which, like Billy Elliot (possibly Lee’s most commercially successful work) is also set in the north east.

Synopsis:- In 1934, a group of Ashington miners and a dental mechanic hired a professor from Newcastle University to teach an Art Appreciation evening class. Unable to understand the teachings of the professor, together they embarked on one of the most unusual experiments in British art, as the pitmen learned to become painters. Within a few years the most avant-garde artists became their friends, their work was taken for prestigious collections and they were celebrated throughout the British art world; but every day they worked, as before, down the mine.